Law Office of Richard Cahan

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(512) 829-6100

*Most Consultations Free Of Charge

Law Office of Richard Cahan

Our primary clients are landlords who have to initiate or at least consider initiating the eviction process due to a tenant failing to pay rent, damaging property, or otherwise breaching the terms of the lease.

One of the primary resolution measures in eviction cases is communication. For example, if a tenant knows they are going to miss rent or be late in paying it, simply notifying the landlord of that is usually enough to stave off eviction proceedings.

In most cases, however, tenants will know that they are not going to be able to pay rent, and unfortunately, they choose to go radio silent instead of communicating with their landlords and trying to work out a plan before trial. In fact, a tenant can usually sign a specific document that will prevent them from receiving an eviction judgment, and landlords generally prefer this because their goal is to get back their property sooner rather than later. The tenant signs a document that says they will move out and not come back, they abandon any property they leave on the property.

The best method for preventing problems between landlords and tenants is to ensure that there is a properly written lease that outlines how things are going to be handled in the event that rent is late or unpaid, and how the process of eviction would begin.

There are a few methods for delivering notices to vacate to a tenant. The best way is to deliver a notice in person (preferably with the presence of witnesses and a video camera). The next best method is to deliver a notice via regular mail with what’s called a certificate of mailing and at the same time a notice is delivered via certified mail.

A landlord can provide a notice that informs the tenant that they have three days to vacate the property, this notice does not and is best if it does not include a date or the time, such as 11:59 pm on the specified day. If a landlord fails to deliver the notice that allows the tenant three full days to vacate, then the notice will essentially be invalid. Our firm assists landlords in the drafting of notices, petitions and making the proper arguments in court while bearing in mind that the courts only want to hear the most pertinent details of a case.

For more information on Real Estate Law Cases In The State Of Texas, an initial consultation is your next best step. Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (512) 829-6100 today.

Richard Cahan

CALL FOR CONSULTATION
(512) 829-6100
*Most Consultations Free Of Charge